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Beauty and the Beast and Latin

Walt Disney has turned many beloved classical fairy tales into successful movies. Often classical references may be found hidden within them as precious gems. To find them is to better appreciate the artistry of their cinematic work. This is particularly true of the older movies, but can be found in more "recent" creations that have drawn from the earlier tradition. Such is the case with the 1991 animated classic Beauty and the Beast. The opening sequence is stunning for its visual and musical elegance that draws the viewer deep into an enchanted forest. As the castle comes into view the scene focuses attention on a lovely stained glass window that seems to resemble a royal family crest. Beneath the scene, etched on a scroll in Latin one reads Read the rest of this entry »

How My Road Led to Rome – A Latin Teacher’s Testimony

I am often asked why I became a Latin teacher. The story is not what one might expect. It is every bit a testimony of God's direction in my life. The Lord had a plan and a purpose for me. He made sure to lead me down a path that He clearly purposed for my life, my own Roman road of sorts. Read the rest of this entry »

Latin Alive vs. Henle – A Comparison

To tell the truth, I didn’t think it was possible to have a better Latin education than I was offered. But my mind went wild with the Latin Alive! Reader book that comes after, or perhaps with, level 3 of the series. I would have loved that book!!!

My son and I have jumped right in with Latin Alive! Book 1 this summer. Last school year, he completed the first pass of Henle in Classical Conversation’s Challenge A program. Already, though, just working a little over the summer with Latin Alive, we are much happier with this new program. Furthermore, I can see that my son is understanding and retaining more readily with Latin Alive. This is a much better program than Henle—which I always held in high regard before.

The above quotation is an excerpt from a letter written by a co-op leader from Classical Conversations.  To read her full review of the Latin Alive program and how it compares with Henle (another excellent Latin curriculum) please visit the full article on the Classical Academic Press blog site:  Switching from Henle to Latin Alive – A Letter.

The Griffin Warrior: Amazing Archaeological Discovery on Pylos

On a drizzly May morning in an unremarkable olive grove two archaeologists made the discovery of a century. They found an ancient tomb rich in bronze, ivory, gold, and incredible stories. They found the tomb of the Griffin Warrior. For classicists around the world this may be the discovery of the century. For husband-wife archaeologist team Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker, this is the discovery of a lifetime. The find certainly ranks with the likes of Heinrich Schliemann who found the legendary city of Troy and the remnants of the ancient Mycenaean culture, home of Agamemnon. It ranks with the likes of Carl Blegen who unearthed the Palace of Nestor on the Greek island of Pylos. Read the rest of this entry »

Scripture Memory

My New Year's Resolution? This year it began in August. I am in the process of joining my daughter and her classmates in memorizing the book of Philippians. This exercise is part of a vision that began in 2010 when my 7th grade ancient humanities class first memorized the book of James. Since then our school, Grace Academy, has challenged our students to commit an entire book of the Bible (or extensive passage) to memory each year, hiding God's Word in their hearts. The Association of Classical Christian schools asked me to write an article for Classis, their quarterly journal, about the vision and implementation of our Scripture Memory program. I share it here with all of you. Read on to learn the historical precedent, the present implementation, and the fruit this work is bearing in the lives of our students. Read the rest of this entry »

Gingerbread Pantheon

Augustus was said to have found Rome a city of brick and left it a city of marble. Our Classics Club at Grace Academy is rebuilding Rome as a city of gingerbread! Each year our students take on the task of rebuilding a significant piece of ancient architecture from gingerbread and other edible materials. This year our group took on the Roman Pantheon. We entered the finished piece in the Georgetown Library's annual Edible Extravaganza contest where it won first place in its division. This post shares some of the secrets behind the triumph. Read the rest of this entry »

Imitation in Writing through Latin

l believe the purpose of learning the Latin language is in order to study Latin literature. By studying Latin literature, I mean studying the Great Books. These are great pieces of literature of outstanding merit that have stood the test of time. Such works reflect the worldview of the culture and time in which they were written. Such works have often influenced not only the people of their own time, but the people of times that would follow. Such works should demonstrate some combination of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness. By studying such works we better understand the flow of human thought over the course of history. We better understand our civilization when we know from whence it came. We better understand what is truly great literature. By studying Latin literature, I mean Read the rest of this entry »

Latin Composition: Thanksgiving Theses

The philosopher Seneca is quoted as saying "docendo discimus" [by teaching we learn]. The idea behind this statement is that one must learn something really well in order to turn around and produce that learning for someone else. We teachers could also say "linguam scribendo discimus" [by writing we learn language]. I love for students to practice the grammar and vocabulary they have learned by reading authentic Latin literature. We can take these lessons a step further by challenging students to practice these same tools by producing a composition that imitates the literary works they read. These are two very different disciplines that engage the students in language from two different angles. Such assignments allow them to Read the rest of this entry »

It’s All Greek or Latin to Me!

Each year the Grace Academy Classics Club designs a club t-shirt sporting a witty phrase that shows off the joy of the classics. This year we could not choose just one!  Instead all students contributed their favorite Greek or Latin sayings to a classical word cloud in green.  Each saying gives a nod to something special: literature, logic, theatre, theology, and some are just plain ol’ fun.  At the center of them all is our school motto, “Soli Deo Gloria” [Glory to God Alone].  On the reverse the astute will find our clever theme for the year, “It’s all either Greek or Latin to me” written in alternating Greek and Latin script (see caption for picture below).

We wear these shirts on school spirit days, to our club events, Junior Classical League competitions, and just whenever the mood for a cool witty shirt strikes our fashion fancy.  The 2016 shirt has quickly become a favorite.  The shirt design won first place in the club t-shirt competition at the Texas State Junior Classical League with the judges commenting “I want one!”  See below for a list of the featured quotes.

 

It is all either Greek or Latin to me!

Μοι omne η Ηελλην aut Latinum εστιν!

Read the rest of this entry »

Language Tree Project

The Latin Family Tree is a beautiful creation. Its roots run deep into the Proto-Indo-European language spoken through most of Europe c.5,000 B.C. Its trunk reveals beautiful hues of Italic languages influenced by the Etruscans and the Greeks. Its lofty branches reach far and strong to provide the arboreal beauty of modern Romance languages: Italian, Spanish, French, Romanian, and Portuguese. What delight to play in its shade and admire its beauty! Chapter 5 of Latin for Children, Primer A offers young students a peek at the Latin Family Tree. Our third grade class at Grace Academy engages in this study through this simple yet delightful two-day project. Read the rest of this entry »