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Veritas Press Teacher Training 2018

I am pleased to announce that I will return to beautiful Lancaster, Pennsylvania this summer to speak at the annual Veritas Press Teacher Training Conference on July 11- 13. If you attended last year, you may recall that I walked through best practices in teaching through Latin for Children, Latin Alive Book 1, and Wheelock.  This year I will be taking on some different topics, though still related to these same ages and stages. (If you missed the 2017 conference you can get my Latin sessions through Veritas Press).

Here is a sneak peek at the topics I am speaking on this year!

Latin: The Key to the Grammar School

Latin is often considered a core element to a classical education, even in the younger years of grammar school. This session will explore the reasons why Latin is a key component in the grammar years and how this study can support and reinforce other subjects. Topics covered will include vocabulary, grammar, enrichment, and integrative opportunities with other subjects.

Latin: Taking it Beyond Vocabulary

This second session will build on the vocabulary skills introduced in session one. The goal of teaching Latin is to be able to read wonderful stories written in this ancient and beautiful language. In this session the class will move beyond vocabulary to consider how students can apply words to simple sentences, eventually reading simple stories. This class will use lessons within the Latin for Children series along with stories from the Libellus de Historia Reader series to demonstrate how to teach students to read Latin.

Latin I for All Children

As enrollment grows and new students join existing schools and programs, how do we bring new students into our Latin programs? This seminar will explore ways to welcome new students and set them up for success in classical languages. We will look at entry points for grammar, logic, and rhetoric programs. We will also consider opportunities for additional support as students adapt and grow.

Using Latin Alive!

As students mature their styles of learning change, and so must our style of teaching. The paradigms are the same, but we must move beyond them to find ways to make Latin come alive for our students. This session will highlight teaching strategies for older students utilizing some of the lessons and tools of the Latin Alive program. Karen Moore, Latin teacher and author of Latin Alive, will also share a number of techniques she has developed as we review the finer points of Latin grammar, reading, and even a little composition.

 

For more information on the Veritas Teacher Training Conference, including registration visit https://teachertraining.veritaspress.com/#about

 

Latin Practicum @ ACCS with Karen Moore and Tim Griffith

I am very excited to partner with Tim Griffith in bringing a full day of Latin wonder to the pre-conference for the 2018 Repairing the Ruins Conference, hosted by the Association of Classical Christian Schools. My distinguished colleague is a professor of classical studies at New St. Andrews College and the brilliant creator of Picta Dicta (click to see my earlier post extolling this site!). I have enjoyed getting to know him over the last year as we exchanged ideas and shared our passion for Latin.

Our goal as we join forces is to bring together teachers from a variety of disciplines, approaches, and backgrounds to discuss “best practices” for the various ages and stages of learning. Every teacher has their own strengths, weaknesses, and preferences. Likewise, our students all have various approaches to learning. The goal is to find the best ways to engage students in a variety of approaches to strengthen not only their skill sets in language, but their love for learning. Tim and I will also share a wide variety of resources for use inside the classroom as well as for teacher development outside the classroom.

This practicum will be followed by seminars on Latin during the main conference that will build on the sessions from the practicum with the aim of empowering and encouraging teachers for the new year.

Check out the synopses for the practicum as well as our individual seminars at http://2018.repairingtheruins.org/latin-practicum/.  The link will take you to a detailed description for the Practicum. The synopses for our individual sessions during the main conference are provided below.

Practicum Details

ACCS Latin Practicum Details – Tim Griffith & Karen Moore

Teaching Latin that Good Old Way but in the Twenty-First Century – Tim Griffith (main conference)

It may seem impractical to spend valuable class time learning to write or speak in a dead language. As almost everyone capable of using Latin is now dead, even those who see the value of learning the language at all usually only see the value of learning to read it. But composing Latin, whether aloud or on paper, has been proven for centuries to be an excellent way for students to learn to read it better. This workshop will demonstrate how teachers can teach Latin the old and proven way—through composition and oral composition—while using powerful tools from the 21st century.

Latin as the True Liberal Art – Karen Moore (main conference)

In sixth century A.D., Cassiodorus ambitiously outlined a program that would integrate the proven academic studies of Greece and Rome with the study of sacred writing deemed necessary to fully equip the mind and the souls of our youth for a life lived to the glory of God alone. In this text it was Cassiodorus who laid out the seven liberal arts as the pillars of such education. Today the term liberal arts is not so clear cut as it once was. Modern day students and even educators might struggle to give a clear and concise definition. We in classical Christian education still look to Cassiodorus’ framework to define this magnificent seven as grammar, logic, rhetoric (the trivium), along with arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy (the quadrivium). The challenge we face in modern times is to redeem an approach to teaching these seven liberal arts as part of an integrated whole. The Latin classroom may be the last bastion of such study. As the lingua franca of urope for well over a millenia, Latin is the common thread that draws all seven studies together. In Latin we find the rhetoric of Cicero and Quintilian. In Latin we find the scientific treatises of Galileo and Newton. In Latin we find the muses who inspired Vergil and the countless poets and artists who followed him. In Latin we find the writings of the early church fathers, the chronicles of church history. Within a Latin reading course the teacher has the delightful opportunity to lead students through all these studies. Latin is not merely a study of language, but a course in world knowledge. This workshop intends to demonstrate how such readings may be woven together to showcase the seven liberal arts as students grow in their reading proficiency.

  • Hint: This presentation will include some of the lesson plans featured on this blog site that integrate the study of Latin with other disciplines!

Hiding God’s Word in their Hearts – Karen Moore (main conference)

Most of us would readily agree with the importance and even the necessity of memorizing some Scripture. This exercise seems to be emphasized particularly within the grammar school as our dear little sponges readily and eagerly soak up any data to be memorized from grammar chants to math facts to short poems, often using delightful ditties to ease the labor. However, the suggestion of asking older students to commit whole books of the Bible to memory might be considered daunting to say the least. Why? Truly the biggest obstacle may be that in this postmodern era we have no cultural precedent for such a discipline of memory. This is a discipline so far removed from what we have learned that our frame of reference feels inadequate. How can it be done? This resentation provides both an apologetic for the memorization of large quantities of Scripture and a model for accomplishing these goals. Mrs. Moore will call upon examples from Scripture and educational models from the ancient Mediterranean world as she demonstrates what upper school students are presently accomplishing at Grace Academy.

Gingerbread Construction – Recipes and Tips

On this blog site I have posted multiple projects that teach lessons in ancient architecture via gingerbread. This particular post will offer a "behind the scenes" look at the construction process. Read on for information on creative tools, gingerbread and icing recipes, and a variety of construction tips. Caveat: this post will make you hungry! Read the rest of this entry »

Edible Architecture: Hadrian’s Wall

Among the most creative of our edible construction projects was Hadrian's Wall. This project was very unique, very different from other projects of its kind. First, instead of recreating a finished structure, we opted to recreate the structure in process. Second, this project did not use any gingerbread. However, like all of our other edible architecture projects we did recreate a structure that was significant to the classical world, and every piece was edible. Read on to learn a little history behind the real wall, and then how to build your own sweet replica. Read the rest of this entry »

Columbus Day Reading: Integrating History, Language, and Science

Each October my 9th grade students enjoy reading selections from the Latin Letter of Columbus. Columbus addressed his to the monarchs of Spain, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, and thus he originally wrote the letter in Spanish. The monarchs were delighted by the discovery and immediately wanted to share news of this new world with all of Europe. Therefore, in 1493 they  published Columbus' letter in Latin, and sent it throughout all of Europe. At that time Latin was the lingua franca of the day, and every well-educated man, woman, and child would be able to read these great tidings. This leaves us a wonderful sample of Renaissance Latin about historical places and events on our side of the pond. Read on to learn how I use this letter to integrate the study of Latin with American History and how this provides the basis for a creative composition assignment! Read the rest of this entry »

Latin Authors in Italy: A Study Tour for Teachers

This summer I was afforded the great blessing of attending Latin Authors in Italy, a study tour designed specifically for high school Latin teachers. The title and description resonated with me immediately. Here I was promised the opportunity to read Latin authors in situ, to walk through the remains of Ancient Rome with an experienced archaeologist, and to discuss practical pedagogical applications with an experienced high school Latin teacher. The balance of culture, history, art, and literature described seemed almost too good to be true. The experience did not disappoint, on the contrary it exceeded my every expectation. Read on for my full review of the summer study program every Latin teacher dreams of (or should). Read the rest of this entry »

Vocabulary Building with Picta Dicta

Picta Dicta is an innovative and highly engaging tool for students to build their Latin vocabulary. This program could easily serve as an introduction for young students into the delightful world of Latin. The lessons would also prove a wonderful supplement to any Latin curricula, or even as a summer strengthening program for Latin students. The approach engages students in learning vocabulary through pictures and images rather than the usual vocab word list found in most textbooks. Read the rest of this entry »

Art-Literature Analysis: Student Assignment

As an end of year project for my AP Latin students, I assign an art analysis paper based upon a scene from either Vergil's Aeneid or Caesar's de Bello Gallico. The students are to choose a masterpiece that accurately depicts one such scene. This assignment is a student favorite as it causes the students to look back and call upon what they have learned of the story and the language from the vantage point of one who has completed a rigorous journey and now stands upon the mountain top, surveying the view of the road from whence they came. The remainder of this post is written by one of my Latin students. This is her piece of art-literature analysis based on a scene from Aeneid VI. Read the rest of this entry »

Rainbow Resource: Review of Latin Alive Book 1

The following review of the Latin Alive series is posted on Rainbow Resource Center.

Maybe you just recently decided to incorporate Latin into your homeschool, and you’re looking over your shoulder at the fun and simple elementary programs that are now too basic and ahead at the thick and intimidating upper-level courses available. You wonder, “Can my child really handle that?” If you’re wanting to begin now, never fear! This well-designed and manageable course by Classical Academic Press is designed for middle school and high-school students who are just starting out in Latin. The series, which will eventually consist of three books which make up a 3-year program, provides students the opportunity to learn the Latin language and grammar, using an incremental approach. Drawing upon the successful teaching methodology used in Wheelock’s Latin, the authors of this program have in essence taken the best approaches and features of Wheelock’s, and designed a thorough course that is more appropriate (and exciting) for middle school and high school beginners. Also, because the novelty of studying Latin only goes so far, the program also does a fantastic job of demonstrating how relevant Latin is to us, even today. If you are not just starting out in Latin, or perhaps even wanting to continue your journey from Latin for Children, you will find much review in Book One, but thorough coverage of grammar and the reading passages from Latin writers will be well worth continuing your journey.

For the full review, which includes a thorough description of the book click here.

Composition Assignment: Classic Narratives

Our 3rd grade grammar school students love that first special moment that they are able to read a story in Latin for themselves. This is a huge milestone. Their eyes just light up with the realization that they are truly comprehending a story in another language. From that moment on, Latin stories become a favorite class activity. Another great milestone comes at the end of 5th grade when they are then able to compose a story in Latin for others to read. Up until this moment they have received the joyful gift of reading, now they are able to give that gift in return. This post outlines our grammar school composition project. Read the rest of this entry »